11 Buyers, 1 Store, 8000 Wines

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

On 11:20 AM by The Bloggers @ 67 Wine in , , , ,    No comments
In 2003, I returned from trip to Italy with two bags of dried porcini mushrooms, two bottles of wine, and three bottles of amaro, an ancient Italian liqueur that I had just discovered. Amaro (which literally translates as ‘bitter’) is an herbal liqueur usually sipped as an after-dinner digestif. It typically has a bittersweet flavor, a syrupy mouthfeel and an alcohol content between 16 and 40 percent.

Amari might be flavored with a melange of herbs, flowers, bark, roots, and citrus peel, all of which are macerated in neutral spirits; then the unique infusion is allowed to age in casks or in bottles. Historically, the spirit has often been made in monasteries or pharmacies, then used as an herbal tonic to aid digestion and healing. Now, commercial Italian manufacturers also produce amari, and creative bartenders around the world are experimenting with it as an ingredient in their cocktails.


Amaro Montenegro is one of my favorites. The famous herbalist and distiller Stanislao Cobianchi created it in 1885 in Bologna, dedicating it to Princess Elena of Montenegro. It offers an easy introduction to amaro: Fresh notes of orange peel, coriander, and red cherry on the nose lead to a bittersweet, botanical palate tinged with hints of tangerine. The finish is boldly herbal, complemented by sweet citrus fruit flavors. Enjoy Amaro Montenegro neat after dinner, or over rocks with sparkling water and lemon rind as a refreshing aperitif

casks or in bottles. Historically, the spirit has often been made in monasteries or pharmacies, then used as an herbal tonic to aid digestion and healing. Now, commercial Italian manufacturers also produce amari, and creative bartenders around the world are experimenting with it as an ingredient in their cocktails.

- Karen Ripley
7.3.2013

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

We welcome your feedback.